Posts Tagged ‘Kayaking in Wilmington NC’

1st Kayak experience

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

I recently had the pleasure of taking a family of three from West Virginia on a Sharks Tooth Island adventure to hunt for prehistoric sharks teeth and fossilized shells. This trip was different than others in that I was given to opportunity to experience a family’s first time in kayaks. They were gung-ho from the get-go, ready to learn and create memories. Once on the water I immediately heard the father laughing in excitement. I recall him saying, “this is the coolest thing”.

This family was no green horn when it came to hunting for shark’s teeth. They had been coming to Carolina Beach every summer for the past 20 years. Upon landing at Shark Tooth Island we began finding teeth straightaway. That morning we had a really low tide creating opportunity for great hunting. With the tide so low we were given the chance to hit all three islands, our final stop being Keg Island. Not five minutes after landing the father found one of the largest sharks teeth I’ve seen found. The tooth was of a Great White Shark. It had a full shank around 3 inches wide and was around 2 inches long with the tip broken. We couldn’t believe our eyes. That morning might have been the most successful hunt I’ve ever had with a group. This trip proved that the teeth are out there, we just have to go find them.

Don & Diane Harty own Mahanaim Adventures.  They specialize in helping families and groups to have “Positive & Memorable” outdoor adventures.  Whether these are wildlife view adventure, camping adventure or a simple kayaking adventure.  They provide kayaking adventures on Town Creek, Cape Fear River, Fort Fisher Basin, Masonboro Island, Black River, Holly Shelter Creek and Moores Creek.  Contact them at www.mahanaimadventures.com for more information about all of their adventures.

This Blog was Written by Sam Law. I am Mahanaim Advenures new intern for the summer of 2016. I am a Park and Recreation Management Student at East Carolina, Go Pirates! I love the the ocean and outdoors more than anything. This coming summer i will be writing a blog similar to this each week to let everyone know about the awesome adventures and encounters we have. I hope to see ya’ll out paddling this summer.

Cheers!

Sea Turtles Adventure

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

I found myself at the boat ramp of the Fort Fisher Basin. It was the summer solstice, the longest day of the year. It was also going to be a full strawberry moon that evening, an anomaly which won’t happen again for over 50 years. Along with Don and I was Mahanaim’s environmental education expert, Mandy Uticone. Our customers that evening were with the Wilmington Parks and Recreation Department. After a mile paddle along the Fort Fisher sea wall we landed at Zeke’s Island. Don explained the history and use of the island in addition to its estuary purposes. As our break ended we began paddling the second leg to a beach access were we ate our sack dinners. Just over the sand dunes was a newly laid Leatherback turtle nest. The nest was found that morning, marked, and roped off for its protection. Mandy taught us all about sea turtles that frequent the North Carolina shores and how they nest. During the lesson I helped Mandy by reenacting how a turtle crawls from the ocean, lays their eggs, and buries them with their feet. As the sun began to set we returned to out boats for the final paddle back. Half way through the paddle the sun was setting to the west as the moon rose to the east, a perfect ending to a perfect evening.

Mandy teaching sea turtle class

Mandy teaching sea turtle class

Don & Diane Harty own Mahanaim Adventures.  They specialize in helping families and groups to have “Positive & Memorable” outdoor adventures.  Whether these are wildlife view adventure, camping adventure or a simple kayaking adventure.  They provide kayaking adventures on Town Creek, Cape Fear River, Fort Fisher Basin, Masonboro Island, Black River, Holly Shelter Creek and Moores Creek.  Contact them at www.mahanaimadventures.com for more information about all of their adventures.

 

Sam as the sea turtle

Sam as the sea turtle

This Blog was Written by Sam Law. I am Mahanaim Advenures new intern for the summer of 2016. I am a Park and Recreation Management Student at East Carolina, Go Pirates! I love the the ocean and outdoors more than anything. This coming summer i will be writing a blog similar to this each week to let everyone know about the awesome adventures and encounters we have. I hope to see ya’ll out paddling this summer.

Cheers!

Sunset at the Basin

Sunset at the Basin

 

Moores Creek Battlefield

Thursday, June 23rd, 2016

We found ourselves in the parking lot of Patriot Hall at the Moore’s Creek Battlefield in Burgaw, North Carolina. Don and I were preparing to lead a group of folks from Brunswick Forest. That day we had the honor of guiding many repeat participants whom we had the pleasure of giving a kayak lesson to weeks prior. Our paddle that morning consisted of a four mile trek down and back up Moore’s Creek. During the trip our group paddled under the replica bridge in which the Battle of Moore’s Creek was focused around. Many Prothonotary Warblers were darting across the creek that morning. After our paddle that day we met with Jason Howell, a park ranger at the battlefield, who gave us a walking tour and lesson of the historic sight.

The story goes that in 1773 after the Boston Tea Party, the “intolerable act” is put in place turning Massachusetts into a military state. This scared other states, enough to have other states aid Massachusetts. North Carolina residents send corn and supplies in order to help but were reprimanded by the North Carolina Governor. A frigid evening on February 26, 1776, General Donald MacDonald of the Loyalists alongside of Scottish Highlanders,set camp on the south side of the bridge. Colonel James Moore and his group of militia men and patriots prepare to the North. If the Loyalists are to take Moore’s Creek they will be able to take the North Carolina coast. Before the battle the Patriots remove the bridge tresses and oil the remaining wood in order to sabotage the Loyalists attempt to cross and attack. While the Loyalists attempt to cross the bridge the Patriots planned to attack. The battle happened accordingly to Colonel James Moore’s plan, gaining victory for the Patriots. Although the battle only lasted three minutes over 30 Loyalists men were lost while only one Patriot died. The Battle of Moore’s Creek was a huge step to North Carolina’s vote for independence. Moore’s Creek Battlefield is not only a beautiful paddle, but the area is full of rich history.

Don & Diane Harty own Mahanaim Adventures.  They specialize in helping families and groups to have “Positive & Memorable” outdoor adventures.  Whether these are wildlife view adventure, camping adventure or a simple kayaking adventure.  They provide kayaking adventures on Town Creek, Cape Fear River, Fort Fisher Basin, Masonboro Island, Black River, Holly Shelter Creek and Moores Creek.  Contact them at www.mahanaimadventures.com for more information about all of their adventures.

This Blog was Written by Sam Law. I am Mahanaim Advenures new intern for the summer of 2016. I am a Park and Recreation Management Student at East Carolina, Go Pirates! I love the the ocean and outdoors more than anything. This coming summer i will be writing a blog similar to this each week to let everyone know about the awesome adventures and encounters we have. I hope to see ya’ll out paddling this summer.

Cheers!

Cape Fear River

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

We arrived at a small boat ramp outside of Navassa, North Carolina. We were headed out onto Davis Creek, which flows into the Cape Fear / Brunswick River. Don and I were preparing to guide a group of folks with the Leland Parks and Recreation Department. The area holds a lot of wildlife unique to the Wilmington coastal area. During the trip we paddled by Eagle Island. This island is located just north of waterfront Wilmington North Carolina. The island splits the Cape Fear River in two, thus creating the Brunswick River (flowing right of the island) and Cape Fear River (flowing to the left side of the island).

The Brunswick River has a unique history. At the end of World War II the Brunswick River held the U.S. Maritime Commission’s reserve fleet. The shipyard was the second largest vessel graveyard in the United States, giving it the nickname of the “ghost fleet”. The North Carolina Ship Building Company was located just across Eagle Island, making the river a perfect location to store the fleet. There were a total of 648 ships in the fleet. The last ship was removed from the river in 1970.

Just north of where the ghost fleet ships were moored, we entered Sturgeon Creek. Just after entering the creek we saw a juvenile alligator sunning on a log. After a quick glimpse he was startled and swam away. After paddling another mile into the creek we landed at our final destination at Sturgeon Creek Park in Leland, North Carolina. With great weather and great company we all had an amazing trip that day. I look forward to my next trip out to Eagle Island.

Don & Diane Harty own Mahanaim Adventures.  They specialize in helping families and groups to have “Positive & Memorable” outdoor adventures.  Whether these are wildlife view adventure, camping adventure or a simple kayaking adventure.  They provide kayaking adventures on Town Creek, Cape Fear River, Fort Fisher Basin, Masonboro Island, Black River, Holly Shelter Creek and Moores Creek.  Contact them at www.mahanaimadventures.com for more information about all of their adventures. (wilderness survival info)

This Blog was Written by Sam Law. I am Mahanaim Advenures new intern for the summer of 2016. I am a Park and Recreation Management Student at East Carolina, Go Pirates! I love the the ocean and outdoors more than anything. This coming summer i will be writing a blog similar to this each week to let everyone know about the awesome adventures and encounters we have. I hope to see ya’ll out paddling this summer.

Cheers!

Basic Kayak Safety

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

Before going out on the water, the proper preparation is necessary to have a safe and positive experience. If you have never been, it is a good idea to seek instruction from a qualified guide service or instructor. Also, if you are new to an area it is important to do your homework and research the location you are going.

Having a plan is paramount to a safe successful adventure. Leaving an float plan for a friend or family member is a tool that should be utilized every time you go off the grid. An action plan consists of:

  • Where you are going
  • Who you are going with/ how many people
  • When on the water (time period)
  • When you get of the water

It is highly important to remember water, snacks, and sunblock, no matter how long the trip. Remember, Gilligan and the Skipper only planned for “a three hour tour”.

Keeping the right equipment and safety devices on hand is necessary when on the water. Before going out you should always check your gear to make sure it is in proper working order. Some basic safety necessities include:

  • PFD
  • Paddle Leash
  • Reflective mirror
  • Whistle/horn
  • Compass-map and/or GPS
  • Paddle Float
  • Bilge Pump
  • First Aid Kit
  • Water
  • Flash-light
  • Dry bag to carry it all in
  • Dry change of clothes (wicking & warming)

Weather also has a large influence on outdoor activities, specifically water based. It is important to check the weather extensively before and during your trip as conditions can change rapidly. This includes storms, winds, currents and tides.

When kayaking the possibility of falling out exists. No matter if you are the best kayaker in the world, at some point in time falling in the drink is inevitable. By following two simple rules, you can keep your chance at survival at 99.9%. Make sure that you are ALWAYS WEARING your PFD (personal floatation device) when on the water. It needs to be on your body not just in your possession. Secondly, stay with your vessel whether it is capsized or upright. All kayaks, canoes, and small craft come from the manufacturer with floatation build within. Staying with your boat gives you something to hold onto in addition to making you more noticeable.

Finally, paddling in a group can be one of the best ways to stay safe while having fun adventures with friends. If a few simple precautions are taken, you can make a safe and positive experience.

For a quick video lesson on kayak safety check out the following YouTube video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=otakobRXynM

Don & Diane Harty own Mahanaim Adventures.  They specialize in helping families and groups to have “Positive & Memorable” outdoor adventures.  Whether these are wildlife view adventure, camping adventure or a simple kayaking adventure.  They provide kayaking adventures on Town Creek, Cape Fear River, Fort Fisher Basin, Masonboro Island, Black River, Holly Shelter Creek and Moores Creek.  Contact them at www.mahanaimadventures.com for more information about all of their adventures. (wilderness survival info)

This Blog was Written by Sam Law. I am Mahanaim Advenures new intern for the summer of 2016. I am a Park and Recreation Management Student at East Carolina, Go Pirates! I love the the ocean and outdoors more than anything. This coming summer i will be writing a blog similar to this each week to let everyone know about the awesome adventures and encounters we have. I hope to see ya’ll out paddling this summer.

Cheers!

My First Adventure through the Three Sisters

Monday, May 23rd, 2016

We found ourselves on a river bank of the Black River, kayak paddles dipped in the water, and Don our leader finishing up a safety discussion. We were preparing for a twelve mile journey down the Black River and through the Three Sisters Swamp. As the sun began to rise, our group of nine pushed off. The weather couldn’t have been any more perfect that day. It was slightly overcast with a solid breeze and no humidity, the perfect day for recreational kayaking. Our group of 9 consisted of old friends who were no strangers to kayaking. It was an amazing opportunity to learn from other kayakers while swapping paddle stories. Seconds after hitting the water, the Eastern North Carolina wildlife began to come alive.  ProthonotaryWarbler’s were flying back and forth over the river, while the hooting of Barred Owls echoed in the distance. Further down river we spotted Nutria swimming across in front of our group. The combination of wildlife and perfect Eastern North Carolina weather created a perfect concoction to explore God’s creation and what He has given us. Along the river bank stood Cypress trees in which Pileated Woodpeckers have dug burrows. Each year these birds create a new burrow in a new tree, residing in each for only one season. During the trip one guest reminded us why it is always important to keep close attention to what you are doing. One gentleman in particular found himself upside-down in the water while not paying attention to where he was going. Thanks to his calm reserve and professional attitude we were able to perform a flawless rescue, returning the gentleman to his boat. Roughly 6 miles into our trip we entered the Three Sisters Swamp, a freshwater Cypress forest. This swamp contains trees dating over 2000 years old. Being in the swamp with such ancient beings is truly a breath taking experience. As we exited the swamp the Barred Owl whose hoot had echoed through the forest made his first appearance flying across in front of us. A perfect farewell gift for a perfect kayak trip.

Don & Diane Harty own Mahanaim Adventures.  They specialize in helping families and groups to have “Positive & Memorable” outdoor adventures.  Whether these are wildlife view adventure, camping adventure or a simple kayaking adventure.  They provide kayaking adventures on Town Creek, Cape Fear River, Fort Fisher Basin, Masonboro Island, Black River, Holly Shelter Creek and Moores Creek.  Contact them at www.mahanaimadventures.com for more information about all of their adventures.

This Blog was Written by Sam Law. I am Mahanaim Advenures new intern for the summer of 2016. I am a Park and Recreation Management Student at East Carolina, Go Pirates! I love the the ocean and outdoors more than anything. This coming summer i will be writing a blog similar to this each week to let everyone know about the awesome adventures and encounters we have. I hope to see ya’ll out paddling this summer.

Cheers!

Last Night

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2015

Last night I had the privilege of leading a sunset kayaking adventure for a Mom and her three kids.  When the Mom scheduled this adventure, she told me that her family had been through some really rough stuff.  The Mom was looking for something for them to do together for fun and to be a family creating a good family memory.    After we got off the water last night as we were walking back to the cars, Mom told me thank you for all we had done for her and her kids that they would be talking about this adventure for a long time.

 

This reminded me of one of the reasons why Diane and I started this business and for some of the success we are having.  You see, when our family was young, we spent lots of time out camping, hiking, horseback riding, canoeing and many other outdoor activities.  The vast majority of the times all went well, some not so well.  Those of you who spend lots of time in the outdoors with kids know what I mean.  However about 7 years ago when my son-in-law started dating Hillary, he made the mistake of going camping with us one weekend.  Our kids spent the whole weekend sharing with him all the fun family memories we had doing all of these things together.  Listing to our kids laugh and carry on with each other remember this time together was a precious gift to Diane and I.

 

Last night I was reminded of this simple fact; that we got a chance to help this family create a special memory that they will cherish now and in the years to some.  I guess that I am sharing this with you because we each have chances each day to make a difference in other people lives.  I guess it comes down to perspective and remember that life is not all about me, but how I can be used by Christ to be a blessing to someone that I meet.

Amazing! Wildlife Viewing Weekend.

Monday, February 2nd, 2015

A couple of weeks ago, I had the privilege of guiding a few good friends on a three day weekend wildlife viewing adventure.  We spent the time camping, hiking, enjoying each other’s company and experiencing some fantastic wildlife viewing.  I have to admit that for me a weekend like this is usually about enjoying the friendship and fellowship of great friends.  However, this weekend was so much better because of the wildlife viewing experience that was to unfold before us.

To be honest, I have spent a great deal of time camping, backpacking/hiking, kayaking and more in the wilderness.  So viewing wildlife in their natural surroundings is nothing new to me or the guys I was hanging with this weekend.  I have had the privilege of viewing hundreds of elk grazing in high mountain meadows in the New Mexico Rockies; watching alligators and wild boars rest next to each other in the swamps of Florida; bobcats chasing rabbits through the pine thicket of central Georgia and so much more.  But this weekend was different.  I had heard that at Pocosin Lake National Wildlife Refuge was simply amazing for waterfowl viewing.  However none of the stories of thousands of snow geese and tundra swans on the lake prepared me for what we experienced that weekend.

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This weekend we were camping at Goose Creek State Park, so getting up on Saturday morning was challenging, especially with the frosty 25 degree temperatures that morning.   We were up at 5:30 am and out the front gate of the park by 6:00 to make the 45 minute drive to the refuge.  We got to the refuge just as the sun was rising to unfold a spectacular sight of duck, snow geese and tundra swans all over the impoundments around Pungo Lake.  No matter where you looked, there was waterfowl by the hundreds.  As the sun was rising in the east, you could see the waterfowl taking off in one location and then landing in others.  There were birds sitting in the water, birds standing on the ice covered ponds, birds flying left and right, and birds circling overhead.  Wow, it was amazing seeing hundreds of birds all within the first few minutes after dawn.

This was so cool!  No matter what wildlife blind or water impoundment we stopped at, there was waterfowl everywhere.  Later this morning, we hopped back into the trunk and headed to the northern side of Pungo Lake to explore.  We stopped at the junction of two dirt roads, one of them was blocked off and parked on the side.  We had about a mile walk down this road to the two wildlife blinds on the north side of the lake.  So we headed out with our cameras and binoculars to see what we could see.  As we walked, we started seeing tracks of deer, raccoon, coyote, large bear and other animal tracks we were not familiar with.  Soon we started seeing scat from these same bear that had left the tracks on the road. And I don’t mean just once stack of scat; I mean lots of bear poo all over the place.

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Soon one of the guys in our group stops and points to something across the field that we were walking along.  Off in the distance we spot a huge momma bear with two cubs lumbering across this field about 400 yards away.  We watched these bears for about 10 minutes as they worked their way across this plowed under corn field.  This was simply amazing to watch these beautiful bears as they worked their way across this field.  About 10 minutes later, just as we started off again, we spotted another bear crossing the road behind us.  Four bear spotting within 20 minutes; wow!  Later that morning we learned that black bear in eastern North Carolina typically don’t hibernate due to the milder winters and significant and consistent food sources in the area.

We spent the rest of the morning and early afternoon viewing bald eagles, coopers hawks, coots, teal ducks, and American Black Ducks.  We began to think that it could not get much better.  To be honest, I think we could have called this a day and been quite content.  But then we had heard about something that would blow our socks off.  During this time of the year, each evening you could watch thousands ff snow geese and tundra swans flying in to one specific field to feed.  This took place in a couple of the refuge’s plowed under corn fields; located on the southern end of the refuge.  After talking about it, we decide that we might as well as hang around to see what happens.  So we pulled up to spot we were told about and waited.

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The first 45 minutes were extremely slow.  There were geese and swans in the field feeding but they were all on the opposite side of this VERY LARGE field.  As it started getting dark we started hearing the snow geese fly in from the north. The next 30 minutes were not disappointing to us at all.   Even now I am still not fully able to put into words what we experienced that evening.  I think we all have read and heard stories of hundreds of thousands of bird flying so thick that you could not see the sky.  Lewis & Clark even talked about this in their journals.  This was one of those moments.  Over the next 30 minutes hundreds of thousands of snow geese flew into this field right before us.

As they flew in the field; two things astounded me the most about this event.  The first was the noise of these geese.  The sound of hundreds of thousands of birds flapping their wings at the same time and so close to each other reminded us of the sound of a jet engine starting up.  You could hear this even over the sound of all the honking of these geese.  The second thing was that these birds kept coming in!  There were birds that were flying so high up in the sky; they looked like small specks of pepper floating in the sky.  These birds circled down and down until they landed in the middle of the flock of birds on the ground, not the edges.  Once they landed, the feeding started and did not stop.  Think about it; this was one mass of snow geese, with their heads down, all feeding at once.

This was truly a once in a life time event for me.  I stood there almost speechless not knowing what to say, snapping photo after photo, wondering how to explain this event.  There was about 5 to 10 minutes that we did not have that many birds land.  I guess we figured they would hang around longer, but just at dark thirty, they all took off.  Within 10 minutes every bird in this field took off leaving this field almost emptied.  All of these 100,000+ birds took off!  Think about it, a field with this many birds all taking to wing at once!  Amazing!

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That evening sitting around the camp fire the four of us talked about what we had experienced that day.  We looked at pictures that we had taken and the videos.  It was hard to believe what we had seen.  We all agreed that this was something special and were amazed that we had not heard of this before, especially living here in eastern North Carolina like we do.  One thing we all agreed on was that we had to bring our families to witness this event in the future.

Don & Diane Harty own Mahanaim Adventures.  They specialize in helping families and groups to have “Positive & Memorable” outdoor adventures.  Whether these are wildlife view adventure, camping adventure or a simple kayaking adventure.  They provide kayaking adventures on Town Creek, Cape Fear River, Fort Fisher Basin, Masonboro Island, Black River, Holly Shelter Creek and Moores Creek.  Contact them at www.mahanaimadventures.com for more information about all of their adventures.

Alligators!

Monday, December 8th, 2014

I am amazed at how fearful most people are of alligators that are found here in the Wilmington NC area. This is one of the most common questions I get when I am leading a kayaking adventure.  Yes, we should have a healthy respect and view these wonderful creatures from a safe distance.  However it amazed how the fear keeps some people from exploring the majesty of God’s Creation just because they may encounter one of these animals.  As a boy growing up in gator country of central Florida, you learned to understand the amazing creatures.  So, like any good Boy Scout here are some facts about alligators that my help you know more about this magnificent creature, and be prepared on what to expect when you see one.

This alligator was seen at the southern tip of Keg Island in the Cape Fear River.

This alligator was seen at the southern tip of Keg Island in the Cape Fear River.

  • The American Alligator is the most prevalent of the three species of crocodilians found in the US.  The Gator’s range from North Carolina down to Florida and then around the Gulf Coast to Texas.
  •  There are very few American Crocodile and Caiman that can be found in the extreme southern part of Florida mainly in the southern portions of the Everglades.
  • Gators live in freshwater wetlands and coastal brackish waters.  Their diets mainly consist of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.  They are more known for their savaging for food than hunting and attacking larger prey.
  • Mating season beings in May as the spring warms up and the females will lay their eggs in June, with the eggs hatching in last July.
  • Between 1948 – 2004 there were only 391 injuries and 18 deaths caused by alligators  in the US.
  • Alligators are active both day and night, but mainly feed at night and resting during the day light hours digesting their meal from the night before.
  •  Don’t let your pets swim in known waters where alligators live.  The alligators will see the smaller pets at natural prey.

Dispose of fish scraps in garbage cans and throwing fish remains in the water can attract alligators.  Also, do not feed alligators.

 

 

Before the Adventure Begins

Monday, April 14th, 2014

For those of you who grew up in Boy Scouts, you will know that the “Scout Motto” is to “Be Prepared“.  This was drilled into me during my days as a scout and I can say, most great scout troops still place a great deal of emphasis on this.  To be honest, one of the biggest things that gets to me is watching the vast majority of people take off with their kayaks are woefully unprepared for what they are fixing to do.

This was brought home to me this past weekend when I saw a young couple jump out of their vehicles, toss their kayaks in the water and jump in and go!  No PFD, no sunscreen, no WATER, no clue to the weather coming or going, much less of the river currents that will affect their paddle.  When I pointed out the oyster beds they were fixing to walk into, they could care less (yes, they had no shoes of any kind on).  I could only imagine that they had a less than pleasant time on the water.

It is because of this lack of proper preparedness that I write the next blog.  I hope over the next several weeks to add additional blogs that will help you be “Prepared” when you head out on your next adventure.

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Here are some very basic things that need to be considered before you take your next kayaking adventure.

  • Always try to plan for the unexpected “what ifs?” What if I get delayed? Lost? Injured? Am I prepared to cope with that?
  • Always have a map and compass with you.  This means that you know how to orientate the map and use the compass, so make sure you learn basic map reading and compass navigation skills before you head out on the water.
  • Pick a trip, even a short day paddle and study your intended route on a map at home. Doing this when you’re not stressed allows you time to become more familiar and comfortable with the unique markings of a topographic map and where you will be going.
  • Additional essential items that can save your life when out kayaking:
    • Plenty of water to drink
    • Hat
    • Sunscreen/bug spray
    • Flash light
    • Cell phone
    • Matches for a fire
    • Extra clothing
    • Rain gear
    • Snacks
    • Knife
    • Dry bag for all your essentials to be placed
  • Float Plan.  It is critical that you let someone know where you’re going, what route you plan to take and your estimated return time. If you get lost, the sooner a rescue operation begins the better for your searchers and you.  If you change your plans before you start a trip, call and update someone, even if you simply leave a voice mail.  This also implies that once on the river that you stick with your plan and not deviate.
  • Oh, I am assuming that you will have your PFD with you before you get into the water.

Mahanaim Adventures provide wonderful adventure in the Wilmington and Carolina Beach areas of North Carolina.  We can also customize a guided kayaking adventure to Florida as well as any other location in the Southeast US.  We specialize in creating that memory of a life time for you and your family and friends.  Check out our web page and find out more details about all of our adventure locations.